Seattle Fiduciary Litigation Lawyer

In the context of an estate, a person with a fiduciary duty has a significant and sometimes complicated set of responsibilities — often a set of responsibilities that he or she never signed up for — to act on behalf of another person's best interests in financial matters and other important matters. In some cases, a fiduciary has good intentions but is not clear on what his or her duties are; in others, there is actual negligence or fraud.

Fiduciary litigation may stem from a conflict between family members or from actual misconduct on the part of a fiduciary. When a dispute escalates into a lawsuit, or it threatens to do so, an experienced fiduciary litigation attorney can be invaluable in resolving the matter, either in court or through negotiation, mediation or arbitration.

Extensive Experience in Fiduciary Matters

Equipped with more than 20 years of experience in resolving difficult Washington estate matters and direct experience with fiduciary litigation going back to 1994, AV-rated* estate litigation lawyer Ann T. Wilson is skilled with fiduciary matters. Ms. Wilson advises individuals and represents personal representatives, trustees, executors and other parties in petitions. She handles cases involving:

  • A family member accused of negligence with regard to trust funds
  • Trustees and executors wishing to protect themselves from litigation
  • Alleged breach of fiduciary duty
  • Distribution of funds
  • Beneficiaries of special needs trusts
  • Petitions for instructions

Contact Us

Seattle fiduciary litigation attorney Ann T. Wilson can answer your questions about difficult estate matters and provide guidance on how to proceed. Contact the firm for more information.

*AV Preeminent and BV Distinguished are certification marks of Reed Elsevier Properties Inc., used in accordance with the Martindale-Hubbell certification procedures, standards and policies. Martindale-Hubbell is the facilitator of a peer review rating process. Ratings reflect the confidential opinions of members of the bar and the judiciary. Martindale-Hubbell ratings fall into two categories: legal ability and general ethical standards.